image


WSSHE NEWSLINE

WSSHE NEWSLINE

Spring 2015



“MCP and New Code Changes for Building Owners & Managers"

by Eric Jensen
ThyssenKrupp Elevator
Service & Repair Sales

The State of Washington required MCP (Maintenance Control Program) is the first such requirement in the United States and represents significant changes regarding requirements for individuals who own or manage buildings with elevators. It is important to note that these changes affect both you and your Service Provider. The purpose of this article is to inform you of changes that are your responsibility as a building owner/manager so you can proactively meet the new requirements set forth by the Evergreen State.

You may have noticed on a recent inspection report (and if you have not, it is coming) that an emergency evacuation plan must be in place. This particular item produced a high level of anxiety among owners/managers who were concerned that the requirement would represent an extensive amount of work to meet. Most were relieved to find out that all that is required to meet the standard is the following language on a laminated piece of paper- “In Case of Entrapment call (your service provider and 24 hour number) or 911”. This laminated sign must be hung on, or near, the main line disconnect in the elevator machine room.

It is also the responsibility of owners/managers to insure that the fire extinguishers located in their elevator machine rooms (all machine rooms are required to have a charged fire extinguisher present) be inspected monthly to insure that the certification has not expired and that the extinguisher has not been discharged. This inspection is not to be confused with the annual certification provided by your preferred vendor, but rather requires building personnel to enter the machine room once a month, verify that the extinguisher has not been discharged and the annual certification is current, and sign off on the back of the tag currently attached to the extinguisher.

Building owners/managers must also insure that elevator schematic prints are located in the machine room. Your elevator was delivered with a set of prints, but over the years they occasionally have a tendency of disappearing. You can rest assured that most of you have prints in your machine rooms but I would encourage you to make a copy to put in a safe place in the event that they should go missing as the expense to reproduce them can be high.

Finally, there is a new expense that you should be aware of and it regards Hydraulic Surge Valve Testing. This is a new requirement by the State of Washington and requires a crew to load your elevator to capacity to test the integrity of the pit surge valve. The State has determined that the date of original installation (plus an interval of five) determines when the test is due- for example if the conveyance was installed in 2000, the test will be due in 2015 and if the original installation occurred in 2003, the test is not due until 2018. It is important to note that not all elevators have a surge valve (usually depends on date of installation) but your service provider will be able to provide this information so you can budget for the new expense.

Eric Jensen
ThyssenKrupp Elevator
Service & Repair Sales
[May 6, 2015]

Issues of the WSSHE NEWSLINE can be found at:
http://wsshe.org/news.htm#newsline
 


The WSSHE NEWSLINE is published quarterly as a service to WSSHE Members. The purpose of the NEWSLINE is to promote the Society by sharing information of interest to the Members. Please send brief articles or information updates to the WSSHE Office:
WSSHE@AMInc.org